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Why is Blockstream CTO Greg Maxwell u/nullc trying to pretend AXA isn't one of the top 5 "companies that control the world"? AXA relies on debt & derivatives to pretend it's not bankrupt. Million-dollar Bitcoin would destroy AXA's phony balance sheet. How much is AXA paying Greg to cripple Bitcoin?

Here was an interesting brief exchange between Blockstream CTO Greg Maxwell u/nullc and u/BitAlien about AXA:
https://np.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/62d2yq/why_bitcoin_is_under_attack/dfm6jt?context=3
The "non-nullc" side of the conversation has already been censored by r\bitcoin - but I had previously archived it here :)
https://archive.fo/yWnWh#selection-2613.0-2615.1
u/BitAlien says to u/nullc :
Blockstream is funded by big banks, for example, AXA.
https://blockstream.com/2016/02/02/blockstream-new-investors-55-million-series-a.html
u/nullc says to u/BitAlien :
is funded by big banks, for example, AXA
AXA is a French multinational insurance firm.
But I guess we shouldn't expect much from someone who thinks miners unilatterally control bitcoin.
Typical semantics games and hair-splitting and bullshitting from Greg.
But I guess we shouldn't expect too much honesty or even understanding from someone like Greg who thinks that miners don't control Bitcoin.
AXA-owned Blockstream CTO Greg Maxwell u/nullc doesn't understand how Bitcoin mining works
Mining is how you vote for rule changes. Greg's comments on BU revealed he has no idea how Bitcoin works. He thought "honest" meant "plays by Core rules." [But] there is no "honesty" involved. There is only the assumption that the majority of miners are INTELLIGENTLY PROFIT-SEEKING. - ForkiusMaximus
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/5zxl2l/mining_is_how_you_vote_for_rule_changes_gregs/
AXA-owned Blockstream CTO Greg Maxwell u/nullc is economically illiterate
Adam Back & Greg Maxwell are experts in mathematics and engineering, but not in markets and economics. They should not be in charge of "central planning" for things like "max blocksize". They're desperately attempting to prevent the market from deciding on this. But it will, despite their efforts.
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/46052e/adam_back_greg_maxwell_are_experts_in_mathematics/)
AXA-owned Blockstream CTO Greg Maxwell u/nullc doesn't understand how fiat works
Gregory Maxwell nullc has evidently never heard of terms like "the 1%", "TPTB", "oligarchy", or "plutocracy", revealing a childlike naïveté when he says: "‘Majority sets the rules regardless of what some minority thinks’ is the governing principle behind the fiats of major democracies."
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/44qr31/gregory_maxwell_unullc_has_evidently_never_heard/
AXA-owned Blockstream CTO Greg Maxwell u/nullc is toxic to Bitcoin
People are starting to realize how toxic Gregory Maxwell is to Bitcoin, saying there are plenty of other coders who could do crypto and networking, and "he drives away more talent than he can attract." Plus, he has a 10-year record of damaging open-source projects, going back to Wikipedia in 2006.
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/4klqtg/people_are_starting_to_realize_how_toxic_gregory/
So here we have Greg this week, desperately engaging in his usual little "semantics" games - claiming that AXA isn't technically a bank - when the real point is that:
AXA is clearly one of the most powerful fiat finance firms in the world.
Maybe when he's talking about the hairball of C++ spaghetti code that him and his fellow devs at Core/Blockstream are slowing turning their version of Bitcoin's codebase into... in that arcane (and increasingly irrelevant :) area maybe he still can dazzle some people with his usual meaningless technically correct but essentially erroneous bullshit.
But when it comes to finance and economics, Greg is in way over his head - and in those areas, he can't bullshit anyone. In fact, pretty much everything Greg ever says about finance or economics or banks is simply wrong.
He thinks he's proved some point by claiming that AXA isn't technically a bank.
But AXA is far worse than a mere "bank" or a mere "French multinational insurance company".
AXA is one of the top-five "companies that control the world" - and now (some people think) AXA is in charge of paying for Bitcoin "development".
A recent infographic published in the German Magazine "Die Zeit" showed that AXA is indeed the second-most-connected finance company in the world - right at the rotten "core" of the "fantasy fiat" financial system that runs our world today.
Who owns the world? (1) Barclays, (2) AXA, (3) State Street Bank. (Infographic in German - but you can understand it without knowing much German: "Wem gehört die Welt?" = "Who owns the world?") AXA is the #2 company with the most economic poweconnections in the world. And AXA owns Blockstream.
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/5btu02/who_owns_the_world_1_barclays_2_axa_3_state/
The link to the PDF at Die Zeit in the above OP is gone now - but there's other copies online:
https://www.konsumentenschutz.ch/sks/content/uploads/2014/03/Wem-geh%C3%B6rt-die-Welt.pdfother
http://www.zeit.de/2012/23/IG-Capitalist-Network
https://archive.fo/o/EzRea/https://www.konsumentenschutz.ch/sks/content/uploads/2014/03/Wem-geh%C3%B6rt-die-Welt.pdf
Plus there's lots of other research and articles at sites like the financial magazine Forbes, or the scientific publishing site plos.org, with articles which say the same thing - all the tables and graphs show that:
AXA is consistently among the top five "companies that control everything"
https://www.forbes.com/sites/bruceupbin/2011/10/22/the-147-companies-that-control-everything/#56b72685105b
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0025995
http://www98.griffith.edu.au/dspace/bitstream/handle/10072/37499/64037_1.pdf;sequence=1
https://www.outsiderclub.com/report/who-really-controls-the-world/1032
AXA is right at the rotten "core" of the world financial system. Their last CEO was even the head of the friggin' Bilderberg Group.
Blockstream is now controlled by the Bilderberg Group - seriously! AXA Strategic Ventures, co-lead investor for Blockstream's $55 million financing round, is the investment arm of French insurance giant AXA Group - whose CEO Henri de Castries has been chairman of the Bilderberg Group since 2012.
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/47zfzt/blockstream_is_now_controlled_by_the_bilderberg/
So, let's get a few things straight here.
"AXA" might not be a household name to many people.
And Greg was "technically right" when he denied that AXA is a "bank" (which is basically the only kind of "right" that Greg ever is these days: "technically" :-)
But AXA is one of the most powerful finance companies in the world.
AXA was started as a French insurance company.
And now it's a French multinational insurance company.
But if you study up a bit on AXA, you'll see that they're not just any old "insurance" company.
AXA has their fingers in just about everything around the world - including a certain team of toxic Bitcoin devs who are radically trying to change Bitcoin:
And ever since AXA started throwing tens of millions of dollars in filthy fantasy fiat at a certain toxic dev named Gregory Maxwell, CTO of Blockstream, suddenly he started saying that we can't have nice things like the gradually increasing blocksizes (and gradually increasing Bitcoin prices - which fortunately tend to increase proportional to the square of the blocksize because of Metcalfe's law :-) which were some of the main reasons most of us invested in Bitcoin in the first place.
My, my, my - how some people have changed!
Greg Maxwell used to have intelligent, nuanced opinions about "max blocksize", until he started getting paid by AXA, whose CEO is head of the Bilderberg Group - the legacy financial elite which Bitcoin aims to disintermediate. Greg always refuses to address this massive conflict of interest. Why?
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/4mlo0z/greg_maxwell_used_to_have_intelligent_nuanced/
Previously, Greg Maxwell u/nullc (CTO of Blockstream), Adam Back u/adam3us (CEO of Blockstream), and u/theymos (owner of r\bitcoin) all said that bigger blocks would be fine. Now they prefer to risk splitting the community & the network, instead of upgrading to bigger blocks. What happened to them?
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/5dtfld/previously_greg_maxwell_unullc_cto_of_blockstream/
"Even a year ago I said I though we could probably survive 2MB" - nullc
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/43mond/even_a_year_ago_i_said_i_though_we_could_probably/
Core/Blockstream supporters like to tiptoe around the facts a lot - hoping we won't pay attention to the fact that they're getting paid by a company like AXA, or hoping we'll get confused if Greg says that AXA isn't a bank but rather an insurance firm.
But the facts are the facts, whether AXA is an insurance giant or a bank:
  • AXA would be exposed as bankrupt in a world dominated by a "counterparty-free" asset class like Bitcoin.
  • AXA pays Greg's salary - and Greg is one of the major forces who has been actively attempting to block Bitcoin's on-chain scaling - and there's no way getting around the fact that artificially small blocksizes do lead to artificially low prices.
AXA kinda reminds me of AIG
If anyone here was paying attention when the cracks first started showing in the world fiat finance system around 2008, you may recall the name of another mega-insurance company, that was also one of the most connected finance companies in the world: AIG.
Falling Giant: A Case Study Of AIG
What was once the unthinkable occurred on September 16, 2008. On that date, the federal government gave the American International Group - better known as AIG (NYSE:AIG) - a bailout of $85 billion. In exchange, the U.S. government received nearly 80% of the firm's equity. For decades, AIG was the world's biggest insurer, a company known around the world for providing protection for individuals, companies and others. But in September, the company would have gone under if it were not for government assistance.
http://www.investopedia.com/articles/economics/09/american-investment-group-aig-bailout.asp
Why the Fed saved AIG and not Lehman
Bernanke did say he believed an AIG failure would be "catastrophic," and that the heavy use of derivatives made the AIG problem potentially more explosive.
An AIG failure, thanks to the firm's size and its vast web of trading partners, "would have triggered an intensification of the general run on international banking institutions," Bernanke said.
http://fortune.com/2010/09/02/why-the-fed-saved-aig-and-not-lehman/
Just like AIG, AXA is a "systemically important" finance company - one of the biggest insurance companies in the world.
And (like all major banks and insurance firms), AXA is drowning in worthless debt and bets (derivatives).
Most of AXA's balance sheet would go up in a puff of smoke if they actually did "mark-to-market" (ie, if they actually factored in the probability of the counterparties of their debts and bets actually coming through and paying AXA the full amount it says on the pretty little spreadsheets on everyone's computer screens).
In other words: Like most giant banks and insurers, AXA has mainly debt and bets. They rely on counterparties to pay them - maybe, someday, if the whole system doesn't go tits-up by then.
In other words: Like most giant banks and insurers, AXA does not hold the "private keys" to their so-called wealth :-)
So, like most giant multinational banks and insurers who spend all their time playing with debts and bets, AXA has been teetering on the edge of the abyss since 2008 - held together by chewing gum and paper clips and the miracle of Quantitative Easing - and also by all the clever accounting tricks that instantly become possible when money can go from being a gleam in a banker's eye to a pixel on a screen with just a few keystrokes - that wonderful world of "fantasy fiat" where central bankers ninja-mine billions of dollars in worthless paper and pixels into existence every month - and then for some reason every other month they have to hold a special "emergency central bankers meeting" to deal with the latest financial crisis du jour which "nobody could have seen coming".
AIG back in 2008 - much like AXA today - was another "systemically important" worldwide mega-insurance giant - with most of its net worth merely a pure fantasy on a spreadsheet and in a four-color annual report - glossing over the ugly reality that it's all based on toxic debts and derivatives which will never ever be paid off.
Mega-banks Mega-insurers like AXA are addicted to the never-ending "fantasy fiat" being injected into the casino of musical chairs involving bets upon bets upon bets upon bets upon bets - counterparty against counterparty against counterparty against counterparty - going 'round and 'round on the big beautiful carroussel where everyone is waiting on the next guy to pay up - and meanwhile everyone's cooking their books and sweeping their losses "under the rug", offshore or onto the taxpayers or into special-purpose vehicles - while the central banks keep printing up a trillion more here and a trillion more there in worthless debt-backed paper and pixels - while entire nations slowly sink into the toxic financial sludge of ever-increasing upayable debt and lower productivity and higher inflation, dragging down everyone's economies, enslaving everyone to increasing worktime and decreasing paychecks and unaffordable healthcare and education, corrupting our institutions and our leaders, distorting our investment and "capital allocation" decisions, inflating housing and healthcare and education beyond everyone's reach - and sending people off to die in endless wars to prop up the deadly failing Saudi-American oil-for-arms Petrodollar ninja-mined currency cartel.
In 2008, when the multinational insurance company AIG (along with their fellow gambling buddies at the multinational investment banks Bear Stearns and Lehmans) almost went down the drain due to all their toxic gambling debts, they also almost took the rest of the world with them.
And that's when the "core" dev team working for the miners central banks (the Fed, ECB, BoE, BoJ - who all report to the "central bank of central banks" BIS in Basel) - started cranking up their mining rigs printing presses and keyboards and pixels to the max, unilaterally manipulating the "issuance schedule" of their shitcoins and flooding the world with tens of trillions in their worthless phoney fiat to save their sorry asses after all their toxic debts and bad bets.
AXA is at the very rotten "core" of this system - like AIG, a "systemically important" (ie, "too big to fail") mega-gigantic multinational insurance company - a fantasy fiat finance firm quietly sitting at the rotten core of our current corrupt financial system, basically impacting everything and everybody on this planet.
The "masters of the universe" from AXA are the people who go to Davos every year wining and dining on lobster and champagne - part of that elite circle that prints up endless money which they hand out to their friends while they continue to enslave everyone else - and then of course they always turn around and tell us we can't have nice things like roads and schools and healthcare because "austerity". (But somehow we always can have plenty of wars and prisons and climate change and terrorism because for some weird reason our "leaders" seem to love creating disasters.)
The smart people at AXA are probably all having nightmares - and the smart people at all the other companies in that circle of "too-big-to-fail" "fantasy fiat finance firms" are probably also having nightmares - about the following very possible scenario:
If Bitcoin succeeds, debt-and-derivatives-dependent financial "giants" like AXA will probably be exposed as having been bankrupt this entire time.
All their debts and bets will be exposed as not being worth the paper and pixels they were printed on - and at that point, in a cryptocurrency world, the only real money in the world will be "counterparty-free" assets ie cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin - where all you need to hold is your own private keys - and you're not dependent on the next deadbeat debt-ridden fiat slave down the line coughing up to pay you.
Some of those people at AXA and the rest of that mafia are probably quietly buying - sad that they missed out when Bitcoin was only $10 or $100 - but happy they can still get it for $1000 while Blockstream continues to suppress the price - and who knows, what the hell, they might as well throw some of that juicy "banker's bonus" into Bitcoin now just in case it really does go to $1 million a coin someday - which it could easily do with just 32MB blocks, and no modifications to the code (ie, no SegWit, no BU, no nuthin', just a slowly growing blocksize supporting a price growing roughly proportional to the square of the blocksize - like Bitcoin always actually did before the economically illiterate devs at Blockstream imposed their centrally planned blocksize on our previously decentralized system).
Meanwhile, other people at AXA and other major finance firms might be taking a different tack: happy to see all the disinfo and discord being sown among the Bitcoin community like they've been doing since they were founded in late 2014 - buying out all the devs, dumbing down the community to the point where now even the CTO of Blockstream Greg Mawxell gets the whitepaper totally backwards.
Maybe Core/Blockstream's failure-to-scale is a feature not a bug - for companies like AXA.
After all, AXA - like most of the major banks in the Europe and the US - are now basically totally dependent on debt and derivatives to pretend they're not already bankrupt.
Maybe Blockstream's dead-end road-map (written up by none other than Greg Maxwell), which has been slowly strangling Bitcoin for over two years now - and which could ultimately destroy Bitcoin via the poison pill of Core/Blockstream's SegWit trojan horse - maybe all this never-ending history of obstrution and foot-dragging and lying and failure from Blockstream is actually a feature and not a bug, as far as AXA and their banking buddies are concerned.
The insurance company with the biggest exposure to the 1.2 quadrillion dollar (ie, 1200 TRILLION dollar) derivatives casino is AXA. Yeah, that AXA, the company whose CEO is head of the Bilderberg Group, and whose "venture capital" arm bought out Bitcoin development by "investing" in Blockstream.
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/4k1r7v/the_insurance_company_with_the_biggest_exposure/
If Bitcoin becomes a major currency, then tens of trillions of dollars on the "legacy ledger of fantasy fiat" will evaporate, destroying AXA, whose CEO is head of the Bilderbergers. This is the real reason why AXA bought Blockstream: to artificially suppress Bitcoin volume and price with 1MB blocks.
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/4r2pw5/if_bitcoin_becomes_a_major_currency_then_tens_of/
AXA has even invented some kind of "climate catastrophe" derivative - a bet where if the global warming destroys an entire region of the world, the "winner" gets paid.
Of course, derivatives would be something attractive to an insurance company - since basically most of their business is about making and taking bets.
So who knows - maybe AXA is "betting against" Bitcoin - and their little investment in the loser devs at Core/Blockstream is part of their strategy for "winning" that bet.
This trader's price & volume graph / model predicted that we should be over $10,000 USD/BTC by now. The model broke in late 2014 - when AXA-funded Blockstream was founded, and started spreading propaganda and crippleware, centrally imposing artificially tiny blocksize to suppress the volume & price.
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/5obe2m/this_traders_price_volume_graph_model_predicted/
"I'm angry about AXA scraping some counterfeit money out of their fraudulent empire to pay autistic lunatics millions of dollars to stall the biggest sociotechnological phenomenon since the internet and then blame me and people like me for being upset about it." ~ u/dresden_k
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/5xjkof/im_angry_about_axa_scraping_some_counterfeit/
Bitcoin can go to 10,000 USD with 4 MB blocks, so it will go to 10,000 USD with 4 MB blocks. All the censorship & shilling on r\bitcoin & fantasy fiat from AXA can't stop that. BitcoinCORE might STALL at 1,000 USD and 1 MB blocks, but BITCOIN will SCALE to 10,000 USD and 4 MB blocks - and beyond
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/5jgkxv/bitcoin_can_go_to_10000_usd_with_4_mb_blocks_so/
AXA/Blockstream are suppressing Bitcoin price at 1000 bits = 1 USD. If 1 bit = 1 USD, then Bitcoin's market cap would be 15 trillion USD - close to the 82 trillion USD of "money" in the world. With Bitcoin Unlimited, we can get to 1 bit = 1 USD on-chain with 32MB blocksize ("Million-Dollar Bitcoin")
https://www.reddit.com/btc/comments/5u72va/axablockstream_are_suppressing_bitcoin_price_at/
Anyways, people are noticing that it's a little... odd... the way Greg Maxwell seems to go to such lengths, in order to cover up the fact that bigger blocks have always correlated to higher price.
He seems to get very... uncomfortable... when people start pointing out that:
It sure looks like AXA is paying Greg Maxwell to suppress the Bitcoin price.
Greg Maxwell has now publicly confessed that he is engaging in deliberate market manipulation to artificially suppress Bitcoin adoption and price. He could be doing this so that he and his associates can continue to accumulate while the price is still low (1 BTC = $570, ie 1 USD can buy 1750 "bits")
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/4wgq48/greg_maxwell_has_now_publicly_confessed_that_he/
Why did Blockstream CTO u/nullc Greg Maxwell risk being exposed as a fraud, by lying about basic math? He tried to convince people that Bitcoin does not obey Metcalfe's Law (claiming that Bitcoin price & volume are not correlated, when they obviously are). Why is this lie so precious to him?
https://www.reddit.com/btc/comments/57dsgz/why_did_blockstream_cto_unullc_greg_maxwell_risk/
I don't know how a so-called Bitcoin dev can sleep at night knowing he's getting paid by fucking AXA - a company that would probably go bankrupt if Bitcoin becomes a major world currency.
Greg must have to go through some pretty complicated mental gymastics to justify in his mind what everyone else can see: he is a fucking sellout to one of the biggest fiat finance firms in the world - he's getting paid by (and defending) a company which would probably go bankrupt if Bitcoin ever achieved multi-trillion dollar market cap.
Greg is literally getting paid by the second-most-connected "systemically important" (ie, "too big to fail") finance firm in the world - which will probably go bankrupt if Bitcoin were ever to assume its rightful place as a major currency with total market cap measured in the tens of trillions of dollars, destroying most of the toxic sludge of debt and derivatives keeping a bank financial giant like AXA afloat.
And it may at first sound batshit crazy (until You Do The Math), but Bitcoin actually really could go to one-million-dollars-a-coin in the next 8 years or so - without SegWit or BU or anything else - simply by continuing with Satoshi's original 32MB built-in blocksize limit and continuing to let miners keep blocks as small as possible to satisfy demand while avoiding orphans - a power which they've had this whole friggin' time and which they've been managing very well thank you.
Bitcoin Original: Reinstate Satoshi's original 32MB max blocksize. If actual blocks grow 54% per year (and price grows 1.542 = 2.37x per year - Metcalfe's Law), then in 8 years we'd have 32MB blocks, 100 txns/sec, 1 BTC = 1 million USD - 100% on-chain P2P cash, without SegWit/Lightning or Unlimited
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/5uljaf/bitcoin_original_reinstate_satoshis_original_32mb/
Meanwhile Greg continues to work for Blockstream which is getting tens of millions of dollars from a company which would go bankrupt if Bitcoin were to actually scale on-chain to 32MB blocks and 1 million dollars per coin without all of Greg's meddling.
So Greg continues to get paid by AXA, spreading his ignorance about economics and his lies about Bitcoin on these forums.
In the end, who knows what Greg's motivations are, or AXA's motivations are.
But one thing we do know is this:
Satoshi didn't put Greg Maxwell or AXA in charge of deciding the blocksize.
The tricky part to understand about "one CPU, one vote" is that it does not mean there is some "pre-existing set of rules" which the miners somehow "enforce" (despite all the times when you hear some Core idiot using words like "consensus layer" or "enforcing the rules").
The tricky part about really understanding Bitcoin is this:
Hashpower doesn't just enforce the rules - hashpower makes the rules.
And if you think about it, this makes sense.
It's the only way Bitcoin actually could be decentralized.
It's kinda subtle - and it might be hard for someone to understand if they've been a slave to centralized authorities their whole life - but when we say that Bitcoin is "decentralized" then what it means is:
We all make the rules.
Because if hashpower doesn't make the rules - then you'd be right back where you started from, with some idiot like Greg Maxwell "making the rules" - or some corrupt too-big-to-fail bank debt-and-derivative-backed "fantasy fiat financial firm" like AXA making the rules - by buying out a dev team and telling us that that dev team "makes the rules".
But fortunately, Greg's opinions and ignorance and lies don't matter anymore.
Miners are waking up to the fact that they've always controlled the blocksize - and they always will control the blocksize - and there isn't a single goddamn thing Greg Maxwell or Blockstream or AXA can do to stop them from changing it - whether the miners end up using BU or Classic or BitcoinEC or they patch the code themselves.
The debate is not "SHOULD THE BLOCKSIZE BE 1MB VERSUS 1.7MB?". The debate is: "WHO SHOULD DECIDE THE BLOCKSIZE?" (1) Should an obsolete temporary anti-spam hack freeze blocks at 1MB? (2) Should a centralized dev team soft-fork the blocksize to 1.7MB? (3) OR SHOULD THE MARKET DECIDE THE BLOCKSIZE?
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/5pcpec/the_debate_is_not_should_the_blocksize_be_1mb/
Core/Blockstream are now in the Kübler-Ross "Bargaining" phase - talking about "compromise". Sorry, but markets don't do "compromise". Markets do COMPETITION. Markets do winner-takes-all. The whitepaper doesn't talk about "compromise" - it says that 51% of the hashpower determines WHAT IS BITCOIN.
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/5y9qtg/coreblockstream_are_now_in_the_k%C3%BCblerross/
Clearing up Some Widespread Confusions about BU
Core deliberately provides software with a blocksize policy pre-baked in.
The ONLY thing BU-style software changes is that baking in. It refuses to bundle controversial blocksize policy in with the rest of the code it is offering. It unties the blocksize settings from the dev teams, so that you don't have to shop for both as a packaged unit.
The idea is that you can now have Core software security without having to submit to Core blocksize policy.
Running Core is like buying a Sony TV that only lets you watch Fox, because the other channels are locked away and you have to know how to solder a circuit board to see them. To change the channel, you as a layman would have to switch to a different TV made by some other manufacturer, who you may not think makes as reliable of TVs.
This is because Sony believes people should only ever watch Fox "because there are dangerous channels out there" or "because since everyone needs to watch the same channel, it is our job to decide what that channel is."
So the community is stuck with either watching Fox on their nice, reliable Sony TVs, or switching to all watching ABC on some more questionable TVs made by some new maker (like, in 2015 the XT team was the new maker and BIP101 was ABC).
BU (and now Classic and BitcoinEC) shatters that whole bizarre paradigm. BU is a TV that lets you tune to any channel you want, at your own risk.
The community is free to converge on any channel it wants to, and since everyone in this analogy wants to watch the same channel they will coordinate to find one.
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/602vsy/clearing_up_some_widespread_confusions_about_bu/
Adjustable blocksize cap (ABC) is dangerous? The blocksize cap has always been user-adjustable. Core just has a really shitty inferface for it.
What does it tell you that Core and its supporters are up in arms about a change that merely makes something more convenient for users and couldn't be prevented from happening anyway? Attacking the adjustable blocksize feature in BU and Classic as "dangerous" is a kind of trap, as it is an implicit admission that Bitcoin was being protected only by a small barrier of inconvenience, and a completely temporary one at that. If this was such a "danger" or such a vector for an "attack," how come we never heard about it before?
Even if we accept the improbable premise that inconvenience is the great bastion holding Bitcoin together and the paternalistic premise that stakeholders need to be fed consensus using a spoon of inconvenience, we still must ask, who shall do the spoonfeeding?
Core accepts these two amazing premises and further declares that Core alone shall be allowed to do the spoonfeeding. Or rather, if you really want to you can be spoonfed by other implementation clients like libbitcoin and btcd as long as they are all feeding you the same stances on controversial consensus settings as Core does.
It is high time the community see central planning and abuse of power for what it is, and reject both:
  • Throw off central planning by removing petty "inconvenience walls" (such as baked-in, dev-recommended blocksize caps) that interfere with stakeholders coordinating choices amongst themselves on controversial matters ...
  • Make such abuse of power impossible by encouraging many competing implementations to grow and blossom
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/617gf9/adjustable_blocksize_cap_abc_is_dangerous_the/
So it's time for Blockstream CTO Greg Maxwell u/nullc to get over his delusions of grandeur - and to admit he's just another dev, with just another opinion.
He also needs to look in the mirror and search his soul and confront the sad reality that he's basically turned into a sellout working for a shitty startup getting paid by the 5th (or 4th or 2nd) "most connected", "systemically important", "too-big-to-fail", debt-and-derivative-dependent multinational bank mega-insurance giant in the world AXA - a major fiat firm firm which is terrified of going bankrupt just like that other mega-insurnace firm AIG already almost did before the Fed rescued them in 2008 - a fiat finance firm which is probably very conflicted about Bitcoin, at the very least.
Blockstream CTO Greg Maxwell is getting paid by the most systemically important bank mega-insurance giant in the world, sitting at the rotten "core" of the our civilization's corrupt, dying fiat cartel.
Blockstream CTO Greg Maxwell is getting paid by a mega-bank mega-insurance company that will probably go bankrupt if and when Bitcoin ever gets a multi-trillion dollar market cap, which it can easily do with just 32MB blocks and no code changes at all from clueless meddling devs like him.
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[Table] IAmA: I was a professional password cracker who taught government agents who's now working on a secure distributed communications & computation platform with bitcoin instead of upvotes. AMA!

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Date: 2014-05-03
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a more serious question, what is password cracking like? Bruteforcing hashes, looking through source code for vulnerabilities, doing advanced maths or something fourth? First I'd try to figure out if the software was merely using access denial or encryption. With access denial, the data isn't encrypted, but the software won't show you the data without the password. For purposes of criminal forensics, you're not allowed to change the data in any way for it to be admissible in court, but getting access to the file before you have a password can often be helpful. To figure that out, I'd just look at the file in a hex editor; if I could read it, it wasn't encrypted. The next easy step is to scan the program for cryptographic constants; these are things like s-boxes or tables of rotation constants or such that tell me what crypto functions, if any, are being used. For example, if I see 637c777b anywhere, I know it's probably using AES. If I see 77073096, that's a CRC32. If I see 67452301, it's using MD5. After that I'd use a debugger and a program like IDA Pro to start at the point where you type the password and figure out what the program does with it. This is what often took the most time and was the most tedious. Early versions of MS Access, for instance, just XORed the password with a fixed constant; anyone could break those passwords immediately. The toughest one that I was able to break was the encryption on WinZip; it was much better than most stuff I ran into, but still weak enough that I could break it. That was the one I enjoyed the most, like an extra-challenging Sudoku or something.
The hash function wasn't cryptographically strong, so I was able to run a lot of it backwards and get a enough constraints on the input to skip most possibilities. What is this process called if I wanted to learn about it in an academic setting? Cryptanalysis.
WinZip; it was much better than most stuff I ran into Is it any better than 7Zip? My attack was on the old encryption method. WinZip has since upgraded to AES, like 7-Zip. The only way to attack an archive made by a recent version of either of these is with a dictionary attack, trying every password.
What was the biggest password you ever cracked? Nowadays, most software companies use strong crypto, so the difficulty of cracking the password increases exponentially with the length. Back in the late 90s, it was mostly "roll your own", so the strength depended a lot more on the software than the password chosen.
That said, the password I was most pleased with was a 60-character randomly chosen password on a WinZip file using the ciphertext-only attack that later got published.
Was the content worth the effort? What was the content? The content was irrelevant to me; the fact that I had broken the encryption so thoroughly on such an important file format was the exciting bit. When it was in beta, the FBI started sending us files with suspected child porn for us to open. Thankfully I never had to look at any of it---that was someone else's job---but it felt good to know that I was able to help with that. Once we integrated it into the toolkit, of course, the FBI would just use our software themselves.
Now, though, I think that it's more important that people be taught what is right and have freedom---even if such drimes still exist---than to have a society in which every activity is so policed that crime is impossible. I think we should make it hard for the government to do such enormous, sweeping surveillance as we've discovered they've been doing.
If there's sufficient evidence to suspect someone of a crime, the government has plenty of resources to target that individual, and no software will prevent them getting the information they want. Splicious, if it is funded, will help in preventing surveilllance at national scales.
It's funny how no one seems to be responding to the thing you're actually talking about... it seems to me you're raising awareness about splicious. Can you say more about that? EDIT: I need to make clear that it doesn't fully exist yet! We need money to continue to make it real.
As I wrote above, it's a platform for encouraging the creation and curation of content. The idea is to reward both those who create content and those who share it. You may have seen that picture of handing out Facebook likes to 3rd world kids; merely "liking" something or upvoting it doesn't actually help somebody make a living. So all likes/upvotes have real money behind them in this system. The originator of content gets 90% of each upvote, while the remaining 10% is distributed down the chain of resharers to the donator.
We want artists and musicians to use it, but also scientists, authors, and journalists. We think the journalists will be particularly interested both because of the potential to get supported directly in the wake of digital media, but also because of the security features we intend to implement, like perfect forward secrecy.
We hope scientists will like it, because big academic publishers like Elsevier charge tens of millions of dollars for bundled access to their journals and have something like a 36% profit margin. The scientists write and review the articles and edit the journals for free; Elsevier turns around and charges them for the privilege. Splicious would allow people to set up electronic journals quickly, while contributions go directly to the authors and the editors.
Could you inbox me my password if you wanted or felt the need? That would require getting Reddit's collection of password hashes. It would take some effort, but probably a lot more than would be worth my while.
Well, it used to be easier. Wow! Yeah, hopefully they learned something after that. :P.
Could you be a very rich man if you used your powers for evil? I could have in the 90s. I think the FBI are a lot better at dealing with crime on the internet now than they were then.
Hi, I'm a math/CS undergraduate and find this stuff fascinating. However, I haven't a clue how to get started. Any reccomendations on how to get into password cracking and hacking? As to your specific topics, the days of easy password cracking are largely over: any software worth spending money on will use strong crypto. The best one can usually do is a dictionary attack distributed over many computers.
Awesome! What is your ed background? When I got the job I was getting my undergrad degree in physics. I went on to get a MSc and have just finished my PhD.
How much were you taught on the job vs what you had learned through self study? All of the math I learned in school or from Schneier's Applied Cryptography. I taught myself the rudiments of programming as a kid and all my electives at university were computer science classes. I learned to read assembly code on the job.
What would you say is the most lucrative area of infosec (both for black and white hats)? If you want to make enormous amounts of money, you start a company and get bought out or have a successful IPO. That's very risky, though; if you want stable good money in infosec, go join Google's security team: I did and loved it!
Are you employed now by Google? No, I left last year to start working on splicious. I'd like to keep doing so, but we need funding!
Whats this splicious you keep referring to? It's a distributed secure communications and computation platform. It has features to encourage the creation and curation of new content, but is intended to be a general purpose secure distributed computation platform.
The computation framework is based on pi calculus; I've written a paper with Greg Meredith and Sophia Drossopolou showing that we can use Caires' sspatial/behavioral types as a security policy language and let the compiler check that the implementation fits the policy. (TL; DR: We can prove that we don't have security flaws of various kinds.)
Are you Hackers or War Games fan? I loved it when you nuked Las Vegas. Suitably biblical ending to the place, don't you think?
Have you ever hacked people? Not without their permission.
That sounds a bit weird. Hahahaha. It's not much weirder than tattooing: Link to io9.com
Of course they still had to get the hashes somewhere, but there are some pretty powerful tools in the public domain these days, who knows what is behind the curtains in the federal side of the house...(proposed quantum computing password cracking for instance) People simply don't have the ability to remember passwords that are strong enough to resist the password crackers. If your service has the option to use two-factor authentication, use it; when attackers steal gmail accounts, the first thing they do is turn it on, because it makes it virtually impossible for the owner to get it back. If your service doesn't have 2-factor auth, use a long passphrase. Here's some math: if you just use lowercase letters and have a 16-character password, there are around 1022 passwords to try. If you start using numbers, too, there are around 1024, so a hundred times harder. But if instead you double the length of the password, there are around 1044, which is a sextillion times harder. Quantum computation is certainly interesting to the NSA, but the technology isn't up to code cracking yet; scientists are just at the edge of beating the error bound necessary for quantum computations with more than a handful of qubits. Link to www.news.ucsb.edu
How could a regular person like me learn the basics of this? What did you mean by "this"? Reverse engineering, password cracking, or secure distributed communications?
All of it and where should one start? I've done custom rainbow salt sables and attempted wpa2 attacks for fun and cracking hashes using Cain and Able. For reverse engineering, woodmann.com is the place to be. Get a copy of OllyDBG and IDA Pro; there is an older version available for free. Here's a reasonable intro to some of the techniques: Link to yurichev.com
Actual question how good is router security with passwords for example can you or have you hacked a router (guessing default passwords don't count)? I haven't ever tried breaking router passwords; I have my own router, so I don't need to use anyone else's.
Are you the guy that made this video: Link to www.youtube.com ? Yep. In addition to the content creation and curation stuff, there's also a notion of controlling who gets access to personal information. In the video, I drew how Alice can prevent Bob from knowing her name or address while still proving that she's 21.
But we need money to make it real.
Are you in fundraising mode? Are you doing crowd funding? Do you have a site? Yes, we're doing crowd funding. The site is linked in the description.
How is there such a huge disconnect between you and I? I send hours on the computer and can't do shit with it other than reddit and excel spreadsheets. How do you get into it? Is it a lot of reading? How does it work? I think you become good at doing what you spend time on, and you tend to spend time on things that you like doing. I learned this stuff because it made me happy. I get a thrill out of this sort of thing, so I keep coming back.
That said, with enough hard work, you can become good enough at something that it's no longer a drag: playing piano for the first few years sucks. Who wants to sit there plunking out "Mary had a little lamb"? But once you have the skill to actually read music and play it, then you're free to explore all your musical tastes. After you've played a lot of the music you love, you get a feeling for chord changes and what sounds good to you, so you can improvise your own music.
It's the same way with math and programming: there's some hard stuff at the start, but once you become good enough at it, you can start behaving like an artist and do your own thing.
The equivalent of learning "Mary had a little lamb" is introductory programming sites like KhanAcademy or codeacademy or code.org or a bazillion others.
What do you think of the new NSA, using the Patriot Act? I think the Patriot Act traded an enormous amount of liberty for what turned out to be virtually no increase in security.
Is that the same platform that this ex-Googler was talking about in this video Link to www.youtube.com. Yes, that's Vlad Patryshev. He was one of the guys who made Orkut. He was actually really excited about splicious and said, "I've been waiting for this since FidoNet."
Thanks. I'll look into all that. Lol, well that's a different story, a lucky one too. So you had no knowledge or experience with programming and they just hired you? What degree were you going to go after if you went to collee? Oh yeah, did you end up going to college after all or you just stuck with the job and learned from them? I had plenty of programming experience, but no crypto experience. I couldn't decide for a while between computer science and physics. Eventually I compromised and got a degree in applied physics; basically, all my electives were CS. I finished my bachelor's degree, then lost the job when the dot com bubble burst, went to New Zealand and got a MSc in CS, then started a PhD but ran out of money, went to work for Google's security team and started working on the PhD part time. I worked there for six years, then quit to work on splicious. I just finished the thesis and will defend later this year.
I might be late to the party, but what do you think of the XKCD password comic? This is the method I'm currently using with the help of Make Me A Passwords generator. It's spot on. When given the option, use long phrases rather than gibberish. LastPass can manage your online passwords by generating very long gibberish but only require you to use something memorable.
You actually suggest LastPass over KeePass(X)? I was using LastPass as an example of the genre, like how the southern US refers to any carbonated soft drink as "coke". I haven't made an extensive study of the offerings.
Are you Jesus? 'cause you look a lot like him. I was babysitting with another guy for a group of moms once, and when one of the moms dropped off her young kid---maybe four or five years old---he got really big-eyed and nervous. I thought he was afraid of the beard and hair: sometimes people would cross to the other side of the street when they saw me coming. So I invited him in, showed him the toys, and we all played and had a good time.
When his mom came to pick him up, he ran over and said, "Jesus is fun!"
Hey Mike, my understanding is that you've built a distributed platform and also adding on bitcoin support so that every post you make on splicious could potentially generate revenue. i would say that it's a new take on an alternate virtual economy and want to try as soon as they allow public use. are you planning to add some kind of reputation system to it? say, if i want to look for something a'la craig's list style rather than post my poetry? We've been thinking about reputation systems, but don't have any firm plans. Part of the problem with reputation systems online is that people do "pump & dump", using their reputation to steal something. If anyone has ideas or references about fighting this, please PM me.
Was most of your work just using parallelism brute forcing, or did you look for vulnerabilities in encryption standards. Also what is your opinion on the vulnerabilities of dual eliptic curve cryptography? Nearly all of my work was cryptanalysis of the relatively weak cryptography that was prevalent in the late '90s. We started turning to parallelism when MS Word improved its crypto to the 40-bit stuff that was the limit for software you could export.
The vulnerability in the PRNG for dual ECC was clearly inserted by the NSA and weakened everyone's crypto, even the US military and government's. I'm surprised that there's not more outcry from the other government organizations.
Last pass gotta remember that one. The o e thing I'm worried about though is my email is under yahoo and I've heard they are famous with being hacked because of crappy protection programs or leaks even is this true? Looks like Yahoo has 2-factor auth available. If you turn it on, then even if crackers do figure out your password, they won't be able to log in with it because they don't have your phone. That's the single best thing you can do.
Can you explain this like you would to someone who's never heard of hacking? There's no password you can remember that would stand up to modern cracking software. If you use a long passphrase, you might stand a chance. 2-factor auth is the only way to stay safe.
Can you tell me how to turn it on in a pm please. I'll just put it here, since everyone ought to know this: Link to www.zonealarm.com
What's your computelaptop specs? I had a Macbook Pro, like most of Google security team, and got myself another when I left. It has all the benefits of unix with really nice hardware and good suport.
What makes one password cracker different than another? Edit: Wonderful beard. Generally it's how well they take advantage of the parallelism in the GPU. And thanks!
Do you feel That bitcoin as a currency will make it even with all of the theft and ease at which people are being hacked and having coins stolen. I have no particular attachment to bitcoin as a currency. Ben Laurie, for example, has some excellent points about how to keep bitcoin secure, you either have to trust the software authors or spend half of all computing power for the rest of eternity. If you're going to trust people, there are much more efficient ways to mint money. Link to www.links.org
For our purposes, bitcoin provides a fairly simple micropayments service; any other distributed currency would probably work just as well.
We also don't store the wallets ourselves; we use blockchain.info.
I feel the success will be based on micro payments. IE reading a Wall Street journal article for a .05 or .10 fee and not having to buy the whole newspaper or article. Just my 2 cents.. Exactly. A journalist would write an article and share it with WSJ. WSJ would reshare it, and readers could support the journalist by contributing a mBTC. WSJ would get a cut and the journalist would get the lion's share.
So how hard would it to be to break a password of say"iFuCkInGHate2001!!" If crackers get hold of the file with the password hashes, nearly all passwords will be cracked, even quite long ones like yours. A similar password (18 printable chars) that has been hashed once with SHA with no salt would take less than an hour to crack on a single PC. Adding salt makes it harder to build tables where you can just look up the password instantly, but no slower to just brute force.
People REALLY need to use 2-factor auth to be secure.
So what can a person like me who doesn't know much on how to make a password more secure, except making it super long and complex to do to " feel safer" of not getting hacked. First, choose reputable services like GMail, where they take security very seriously. A cracker who can't get to the database of password hashes is forced to attempt to log in repeatedly, which can be detected and throttled to a safe rate.
Second, use 2-factor auth if it's available.
Third, use something like LastPass that generates a long random password for each site and stores it encrypted under a single password that you remember. You never type that password into anything online.
I bet your computer is awesome It's a Macbook Pro.
Last updated: 2014-05-09 00:53 UTC
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[Table] IAmA: I am Julian Assange, publisher of Wikileaks. Ask me anything.

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Date: 2014-06-19
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By your estimation, which modern government has the most transparency? For a small government, Iceland. But it is hard to compare small governments with large ones. In small societies the path length between individuals is also small, so it is easier to know what is going on in government. Transparency is enforced by proximity and cultural norms as well as bureaucratic standards. See Link to immi.is
— Newer democracies were in general more responsive than some developed ones. Guatemala confirmed the AP request in 72 hours, and sent all documents in 10 days. Turkey sent spreadsheets and data within seven days. Mexico posted responses on the Web. By comparison, Canada asked for a 200-day extension. The FBI in the United States responded six months late with a single sheet with four dates, two words and a large section blanked. Austria never responded at all. — More than half the countries did not release anything, and three out of 10 did not even acknowledge the request. African governments led the world for ignoring requests, with no response whatsoever from 11 out of 15 countries. — Dozens of countries adopted their laws at least in part because of financial incentives, and so are more likely to ignore them or limit their impact. China changed its access-to-information rules as a condition to joining the World Trade Organization in 2001, to boost the economy by as much as 10 percent. Beijing has since expanded the rules beyond trade matters. Pakistan adopted its 2002 ordinance in return for $1.4 billion in aid from the International Monetary Fund. Neither country responded to the AP's test. "Having a law that's not being obeyed is almost worse than not having a law at all," says Daniel Metcalf, the leading U.S. Freedom of Information authority at the Justice Department for the past 25 years, now a law professor at American University. "The entire credibility of a government is at stake."
Link to www.apnewsarchive.com
, what do you do to stop yourself going mental with boredom? From my understanding, you cannot leave the embassy or you'll be arrested, so you've basically placed yourself under house arrest. What are you day to day activities? 1) I only wish there was a risk of boredom in my present situation. Besides being the centre of a pitched, prolonged diplomatic standoff, along with a police encirclement of the building I am in and the attendant surveillance and government investigations against myself and my staff, I am in one of the most populous cities in Europe, and everyone knows my exact location. People visit me nearly every day. I also continue to direct a small multinational organisation, WikiLeaks, which is a serious logistical and occupational endeavour. I barely have time to sleep, let alone become bored.
, (and I don't mean this to sound inflammatory), why did you start a website to leak classified information? Surely you can understand that many things kept confidential are for the reasons of national security, and releasing secret documents puts lives and international relations at risk? 2) Confidential government documents we have published disclose evidence of war crimes, criminal back-room dealings and sundry abuses. That alone legitimates our publications, and that principally motivates our work. Secrecy was never intended to enable criminality in the highest offices of state. Secrecy is, yes, sometimes necessary, but healthy democracies understand that secrecy is the exception, not the rule. "National security" pretexts for secrecy are routinely used by powerful officials, but seldom justified. If we accept these terms of propaganda, strong national security journalism becomes impossible. Our publications have never jeopardized the "national security" of any nation. When secrecy is a cover-all for endemic official criminality, I suggest to you, it bespeaks a strange set of priorities to ask journalists to justify their own existence.
What is your opinion on Edward Snowden? Edward Snowden performed an intelligent and heroic act. I and others had been calling for exactly this act for years (you can read about that here: Link to reason.com) I am a trustee for his legal defense and co-ordinated his asylum. Our Sarah Harrison kept him secure in his path out of Hong Kong and spent 40 days making sure he was OK in Moscow's airport. Just last week I co-launched a new international organisation, the Courage Foundation in Berlin. Pentagon Papers whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg, Nobel Peace Prize winner Mairead Maguire and many other great people are involved. Please support it and Mr. Snowden's asylum renewal campaign. See Link to couragefound.org. Snowden's most recent comments on WikiLeaks are here: Link to t.co
What advice would you give to ordinary citizens in regards to how they can have an impact? We are screaming for change, but what steps can we take? What can ordinary people do? Support and promote projects that are acting at scale. WikiLeaks is my realisation of this tension, but there are a flood of others starting. The clash between diversity and global uniformity which has been created by wiring the world to itself is now in play. You are the troops.
Many of us feel helpless, overwhelmed and small. When we are aware of the world and the scale of its inhumanity and stupidity we feel small. It very hard to "think globally" and "act locally", because by thinking globally we become overwhelmed with the scale of the problems to be solved. However the Internet permits many people to act globally in a way they couldn't before. WikiLeaks is a realisation of this tension. By releasing materials on many parts of the world, we empower others to think and act.
What are your views on Narendra Modi, India's new Right-leaning Prime Minister? The election of Modi is a very interesting development in Indian democracy. We have released many interesting documents on Modi's ascension to power, you can see them here: (just search for 'Modi') Link to wikileaks.org and Link to search.wikileaks.org From these materials it's clear Modi can be most accurately described as a "business authoritarian". Whether Indian needs a stronger centre to compete with China is an open question. Inevitably strong leaders make mistakes and eventually lose their faculties. Other than his extensive big business alliances, I think it is an open question as to whether Modi will bring more good than bad to India.
Lebanon is one of the most politically corrupt nations in the world. For its size, it has a massive and complicated web of economic, political, military influence coming from neighboring countries which, many will argue, polarizes the already divided demographic. I love Lebanon and have many friends there, but your description as to why Lebanon is the way it is, is exactly right. It also makes Lebanon, for its size, the most politically interesting country on earth, because if you understand Lebanon you understand the powerflows across the region. Some of that is documented here: Link to wikileaks.org
What is your take on how Lebanon continues to somehow function and what direction might we expect it to take politically, socially, and economically, as the current state of affairs persist? As for the future of Lebanon, I would not presume to understand more than Lebanese do. But pulling back from the dynamics of the moment, I believe the hope for Lebanon is in the web of business, social and political alliances created by the Lebanese diaspora. While the diaspora is often rightfully seen within Lebanon as a corrupting influence, it is also external support for the continued existence of the country in the same way that the jewish diaspora is for Israel.
If you had a chance to do this all again, would you, and what changes would you make? Again - definitely; we only live once and every day spent living your principles is a day at liberty. It is clear that history is on our side. Most of our difficult decisions are constrained by resource limits, not ideas. But I was ignorant about the extent of Sweden's geopolitical reliance on the United States and to some extent the structure of UK society. You can read about that here: Link to wikileaks.org
You are implying that Sweden's extradition request for you was at the behest of the U.S. Given the U.S. and UK "special relationship" why do you think the U.S. would not make a direct extradition request to London? It may well do so. See Link to justice4assange.com
What would you say was the most important piece of information you have leaked? Our ongoing PLUSD series, which contains more than two million cables, has had by far the most impact and continues to be used in court cases and elections every week. You can search it here: Link to wikileaks.org
Closest to my heart, perhaps unsurprisingly, is Collateral Murder Link to collateralmurder.org and the military histories of nearly every death and incident in Iraq + Afghanistan Link to wardiary.wikileaks.org
Elections I understand, but how are wikileaks documents admissible in a US court of law? There are many precedents now to say they are admissible. See Link to www.brickcourt.co.uk
In regards to President Obama you were recently quoted as saying, “You must surely, now, start to reflect on what your legacy will be." How do you think history will remember you, and how do you feel about that? For presidents it is important, but for the rest of us it is more important to get things done and see your legacy in the world. We're doing well in the more academic or comprehensive histories and outside the worst aspects of the English speaking mainstream press. Smears don't have much staying power on their own because they deviate from the foundations of reality (what actually happened). They require constant energy from our opponents to keep going. The truth has a habit of reasserting itself.
Hi Julian! I'm a former SNL writer who penned some jokes that parodied your predicament -- including one you've re-tweeted as a meme. Now, you're probably going to have a large number of serious questions. I'm here to ask: What are your favorite pieces of fiction? And if you got a day out to have a good time, where would you go and what would you do? We all got a chuckle from that. Less so when Amnesty (which is part funded by the UK government) did this: Link to www.youtube.com but still refuses to call Chelsea Manning (or me) a political prisoner. See also Link to roqayah.co
Favourite fiction: Cancer Ward.
What are your thoughts on cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin? Here is a conversation from 2011 where I tell Google's chairman, Eric Schmidt about Bitcoin. Fortunately he didn't listen, or else he'd own the planet by now. Link to wikileaks.org
What is the information you hesitated most about revealing due to safety issues for people involved? What made you decide revealing it anyway? The Penny report. The UK argued to us that it was a "serious nuclear proliferation risk", but on further research, they were full of hot air.
Link to wikileaks.org)
Like Edward Snowden, do you feel the media made an effort to focus on you rather than what you were doing? How would the choice to remain anonymous have impacted Wikileaks? It is hard to stay anonymous and run a big ship. In a conflict at this level, once your opponent knows who you are, then you need the protection of a public profile. This consideration fed into both my and Edward Snowden's decision making.
What are your thoughts on the sexual assault allegations brought against you? See Link to wikileaks.org
Is there any one piece of information that you truly regret leaking? No. We make a promise to our sources. We keep it.
Two questions. Gottfrid Svartholm, one of the founders of the Pirate Bay, is to go on trial in Denmark next month for hacking crimes. Can you give some details on what work did he do for WikiLeaks as a 'consultant'? To what extent do you think his trials in Denmark and Sweden are related to this work? See Link to search.wikileaks.org
As a Nepalese, we saw our Royal Family massacred and the blame was on Prince Dipendra (son of the then King) who also happen to die the next day and the Younger brother of the then king Gyanendra takes the thrown of Late king Birendra, who also gets dethroned and gradually the nation falls under the reign of the Maoist rebels and the entire nation is now on havoc with no constitution as of yet and more violence and crime unaddressed. As a Nepalese neither I nor anyone believes what was feed to us, I still feel the real truth is somewhere and thats what we all Nepalese would want to know is there any Truth missing from what was told to us? Please share your thoughts. I am not personally aware of the situation, but I do recall it is discussed in our materials. See Link to search.wikileaks.org
Last updated: 2014-06-23 11:30 UTC
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